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Market Update: June 2022

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Market Update: April 2022

Looking Ahead: 2022 Trends at a Glance

Market Update: January 2022

Cornerstone Building Brands Announces Acquisition of Union Corrugating Company

What Sets MBCI Apart

Building. Relationships. The MBCI Difference.

The core of what we do at MBCI seems straightforward. As 32-year MBCI veteran Bruce Green put it, “We buy coiled steel and roll form it into metal building components for the construction industry.” While that is the core of what MBCI does, it isn’t the essence of who we are. Roll forming is simple. The MBCI secret is more complex: We don’t just build. We build relationships.

“It’s not about selling that project,” says Green, “It’s about developing the relationship, being there to help educate about trends, different codes or ways that you can do this better, faster and more efficiently.”

Amtrak 4

The Start of Something Beautiful

Imagine you’ve launched a metal building company. You have your engineering department and a source for structural parts, but you need everything else. It’s a real puzzle. At this point, an MBCI representative like Green would introduce themselves and get to know you and your vision. Whether it’s box buildings, mini storage, large, complicated, high-end warehouses, or anything in-between, your representative would work with you to bring your vision into fruition by forecasting week-by-week sales, nailing down the supply chain specifics and conceiving a plan to make it all possible. “That’s how we built the business. Taking care of contractors,” says Green.

And that’s just the beginning of your relationship. Your MBCI representative takes the time to understand not just your immediate goals, but your long-term vision – not just what your business is but what it could be. Because as an MBCI partner, your business can become so much more.

How? Because MBCI backs up our relationship with the largest, fastest, most diverse and most reliable nationwide network of metal component manufacturers.

Thinking Bigger

MBCI operates plants all over the United States. That means your business – which may have initially been imagined as a local company – has the distribution network in place to expand nationwide, while maintaining the schedules, delivery expectations and quality MBCI has built its reputation on. “Nobody has as many plants across the nation,” says Green. “No one has a more extensive product line. No one can deliver metal building components as efficiently and consistently as we can. That’s the way we built it.”

Spring Fire Station #78_2

Key Relationships

MBCI’s reach stretches from coast to coast, but that great reach always includes touch points close at hand. Your primary touch point is your regional district manager. This is the supply chain expert who works with you to build the machine of your business and keep it running smoothly. It’s also the person to call on if any issues or complications arise. Rest assured knowing you have a direct connection to a real human who is dead set on making it right.

Once the program is created, you’ll have another touch point – the customer service representative. This is your day-to-day operations person with whom you place orders and determine specifics like delivery dates and locations.

Service Suited to You

Ordering and delivering material is just the bare bones of the business. The real meat is in the relationship – one that’s tailor-made to fit whatever level of service you need. If you prefer to send in a simple list of what you need, we’ll make it happen. But many clients want something more, and we’re happy to provide that. Green says, “If you called me right now wanting a complete metal building delivered to your address, knocked down and ready to set it up, I can make that happen. Or if you only need a portion of it – whatever you need, we can take care of.”

The service doesn’t end with your project, either. If you discover a leak or a problem with the building, MBCI will send out a specialist to walk the site, figure it out and help rectify it. In addition, we have people to answer your tax questions. We have a technical desk for questions. We even offer professional continuing education courses on topics like metal roofs, warranties and weather tightness. In short, we want to be your trusted resource for every aspect of the process.

MBCI is behind you every step of the way – even in catastrophic conditions. In fact, we operate a hurricane test chamber in Houston where MBCI buildings and components are subjected to hurricane-force winds to identify failure points. Based on the results, clips or fastener attachments are tweaked, or the panel shape is modified depending on where and how the failure occurred. This rigorous testing ensures MBCI products meet all new building codes.

Axiom Apartments_4

Driving Changes

Sometimes codes aren’t what drive changes. As Green explains, “Some of it is driven by aesthetics. You might get into a municipality where they say, ‘We don’t want that typical metal building look in our town.’ So, we come up with a different wall panel.” We’ve done it before and we’re not afraid to tackle it again. That’s what it means to be a partner in the business.

Green sums it up nicely: “When I started out, I was dealing with a guy, and then he retired. Then I dealt with his son. Now he’s retired and I’m dealing with his son. It’s all about the relationship.” We believe long-term, genuine relationships like these are the foundation of good business. It’s might be easy to get distracted by flashy promises or fleeting trends, but at MBCI, we like to think not only how we can help you succeed right now – but how we can help you succeed for generations to come.

To begin experiencing the MBCI difference, contact a sales representative today.

Protecting Metal Panels from Rust

One of the many benefits of metal panels that contributes to their strengths is the fact that there are so many rust-resistant coating options with different levels of protection, making them a great option for virtually any environment or any budget. That said, though, missteps during storage, as well as during and after installation, can leave you with unwanted corrosion, i.e. rust. Factors such as improper storage, improper cutting, or other elements the metal might come in contact with can wreak havoc that are beyond the manufacturer’s control.

Regardless of the finish you have—painted, unpainted, high-end coatings or standard coatings—here are some simple installation and care instructions that can help further maintain the longevity of your metal panel product.

Preventing Rust When Materials Are Delivered

Proper material delivery/site storage is the first step to preventing rust. Be certain to check your panels while uncrating after storage on site for any early signs of corrosion, such as black discoloration or white rust/residue on them. This is a sure sign that that panel has been improperly stored and water has not been able to properly evacuate the panel bundles. Do not install any panel on which this has occurred, as the panel finish has most likely been compromised due to improper storage. If you go ahead and install it, that panel is going to continue to corrode and eventually lead to further rust/corrosion.

Make sure that you’re not trapping any sort of moisture in between the metal panels or restricting them from being able to drain when stored on site. Although the panel itself is corrosion-resistant, if you subject it to repeated and significant water being trapped in between the sheets by either not storing the material out of the mud and ground water, or if you’re not sloping the material bundles in such a manner that they can drain, then the result can yield “wet storage stains.” Therefore, if you want to prevent any sort of damage due to improper site storage, you must make sure that the panel is able to drain while stored and, if possible, tarp to resist heavy moisture concentrations such as snow and ice during inclement weather if necessary.

Preventing Rust During Installation

Next, let’s look at some installation no-no’s that WILL most definitely eventually lead to rust—and things to avoid. The first is the accumulation of drill shavings. Whether it’s a roof panel or a wall panel, when you’re installing the screws, even if you’re pre-drilling for the screws, you’re going to generate metal shavings. If those metal shavings are not removed and left to sit or cling to the sheeting those shavings will rust and will stain the roof or wall sheets. The shavings are uncoated/raw metal with no corrosion protection that can and will rust quickly. Eventually, the shavings may wash off or be blown off the roof or wall, but might not be until after they’ve stained the sheeting, thus leaving you with an issue to remedy and, since the “culprit” is gone, questioning if it’s just a stain or something more serious.

Drill shavings
Drill shavings

Remove the shavings as soon as you can to mitigate this issue. Additionally, if you’re going to do any field cutting, you need to do so via a shearing process utilizing the proper tools, such as electric nibblers, hand snips or electric shears. Any other type of cutting can cause the edge of the base material to become exposed and no longer protected by the Galvalume and painted coatings as they become disrupted. Using tools such as a “hot” saw, abrasive blades or even a reciprocating saw leads to a tearing motion rather than shearing motion, which will strip the metal of that protective coating; over time it can start to rust.

Improper field cutting of panels with abrasive blade
Improper field cutting of panels with abrasive blade

Graphite is another corrosive element that should be avoided as it is not a friend to Galvalume metals. Therefore, stay away from writing on your Galvalume material with pencils because over time the graphite will react, break down that protective layer, and lead to corrosion. If you do write on the panels with a pencil, make sure you clean it off. The best solution is to use permanent markers/Sharpies or dry erase markers.

Graphite
Graphite

Watch out for overspray from any adjacent wall coatings or finish systems like Stucco or similar masonry products, which can also damage panels if not removed promptly. And be certain not to rest the base of any metal panel in direct contact with material that is corrosive, such as concrete, or in such a manner that water can become trapped behind the panel and not able to drain. Industry recommendation is to maintain an eighth of an inch to a quarter-inch gap at the base of all your wall panels for not only expansion/contraction but for proper drainage and to prevent contact with dissimilar/corrosive materials.

Masonry products
Masonry products

Preventing Rust After Installation

Although Galvalume—whether bare or painted—is highly corrosive-resistant by nature, it too has its Kryptonite. Post-installation, the most important thing is to make sure you’re not adding something to the roof that’s going to react chemically/negatively with the Galvalume finish/coatings. For instance, many people don’t recognize that if they have mechanical units on a roof, the condensation that comes out of those mechanical units, when deposited directly onto a Galvalume panel over time, will lead to corrosion and rust. This condensate should either be filtered before exited onto the roof panel or drained via piping and not directly onto the sheeting.

Contact with dissimilar metals, whether it be via incorrect type or method attachment from metal signage, solar panels and snow retention can be another major factor in post-installation corrosion. Panels must not come in contact with or be exposed to the runoff from the following metals: copper (lightning arrest systems, flashing, roof jacks, HVAC drainage); lead (roof jacks, pipe flashing); iron (pipes or soil); and, as previously noted, metal shavings.

Copper
Copper

Post-installation, panels must also not come in contact with or be exposed to the runoff from chemicals, such as acid from batteries and acid washing brick, and even pressure-treated lumber.

Treated lumber
Treated lumber

What To Do In Case of Rust

Let’s face it. Sometimes, despite all your efforts…someone didn’t get the memo and rust happens. Now what do you do? How can you safely can attempt to repair it or remove it without causing more damage?

First off, here’s what NOT to do. Heavy solvents that are meant to remove paint or stains can/will adversely affect the metal. If you witness a rust stain on the roof, don’t go up there with paint remover, acetone or any other toxic solvents and start scrubbing on it because you most likely could make matters worse. You might remove the stain along with the finish entirely, leading to bigger problems. (If you’re an end user, check your finish warranty and manufacturer maintenance documentation supplied to you by your builder/installer for guidance on cleaning and repairs.)

The key is to identify if the rust is just a stain /discoloration or it’s more systemic. Is the catalyst (ex.: a shaving) causing the rust still present? If it’s just a surface stain and the coating hasn’t been damaged, it might just be a matter of getting some mild detergents or something else to remedy the situation. Some good options are Formula 409 or Simple Green and Soft Scrub without bleach or something similar. and it may require a trial and error process to determine which is most effective based on the condition you’re trying to remedy. Products such as Rid O’ Rust or similar whose key ingredient is oxalic acid can be used diluted with water. With any of these products, test a small area first and wait to see results before proceeding to larger areas. And always be certain to fully rinse/flush areas of cleaning products to ensure no residues /films remain.

Always start light. Don’t break out any steel wool and/or metal grinders and start trying to get the rust off the panel that way. If it looks to be more than just a stain—perhaps you clean it and a few weeks later it comes back—that most likely means that the panel has actually been damaged and you’re not just going to get rid of the “stain” by cleaning it as it’ll return. It may require touchup paint or even a panel replacement. It depends on the severity of the damage. If this is the case, be certain to check with your installer, maintenance manual, and panel supplier for further instructions on how to address.

For more information on panel maintenance and warrantiessee the MBCI website resource center.  

Five Installer Responsibilities for Weathertightness Warranties

Every metal roof installation comes with an implied warranty: the roof shouldn’t leak. This is true even if your customer didn’t buy a “manufacturer’s weathertightness warranty.” It’s just the very basic expectation. Any details we send out, any materials, whatever the manufacturer supplies the installer…all go to that simple premise that you are buying a quality roof system from the get go.

Beyond that, though, a purchased manufacturer’s weathertightness warranty takes it a step further. It’s added insurance. In order to get the full value and peace of mind from a warranty, there are certain considerations the installer needs to keep in mind. Let’s take a look at five key installer responsibilities on projects with manufacturer weathertightness warranties—beyond, of course, putting down the roof correctly!

MBCI Calhoun GA 4-09, 06_resized

1. Understanding the weathertightness warranty type selected for the project.

MBCI sells two types of weathertightness warranties: Standard and Single Source. The approval process up front is the same for both but it is crucial to know the scope of the project’s warranty. With a standard warranty, the only real expectation is that the roof will remain watertight for 20 years. It is a very basic, very inexpensive warranty in which the manufacturer and the installer jointly warranty the roof for that period of time. The manufacturer covers all the materials and the details, and the installer is covering the installation.  

The opposite end of that spectrum is the single source warranty, which is purchased when the customer wants not only the roof warrantied, but prefers everything associated with the roofany accessories, anything else penetrating the roofto be 100 percent covered by the manufacturer, if applicable. These warranties do cost more, require inspections, and require an installer to have completed the manufacturer’s certified installer training program. 

It’s important for the installer to know what warranty was sold, particularly because he/she may not have been the one involved from the start. They may be coming in to bid the job as the installer onlyTherefore, he/she needs to ask questions because they may or may not have the personnel on their crew that meets the requirements to install that roof for the weathertightness warranty purchased. 

2. Obtaining/confirming building geometry approval for warranty. 

Beyond the type of warranty, it is simultaneously necessary to investigate whether there are additional procedures related to the building geometry. Has everything been correctly noted so that the warranty itself will be valid? Is the manufacturer aware of transitions, edge conditions, roof penetrations, roof accessories (snow guards, solar, etc.)? It is extremely important to make sure that the geometry—or the conditions of the roofare covered within a particular warranty. 

MBCI, for instance, will review your roof plan and see the eave gutters, the ridge, the rake, etc. and we can survey what’s going on. Is that roof tying into something else? Will there be materials on that roof that aren’t provided by us or not being installed by the roof installer? As the manufacturer, we would be taking a cursory view to say, yes, we can warranty the roof or no, revisions are needed. If there is anything that we can’t warranty, we’re going to spell that out upfront. We will give as much direction as possible to get the project to a point it can be warranted.  

That said, it’s the installer’s and customer’s responsibility to make sure that the manufacturer knows what’s happening. Think about it this way. Many times, there are other trades involved outside of the roofing contract. Along comes someone who says, “I need to run something  through your roof,” or six months down the road the owner wants a satellite dish on the roof and the installer incorrectly penetrates the roof., causing a leak. Guess who they’re going to call? The installer/customer/owner needs to get that approved by the manufacturer. Otherwise, the warranty could be voided.  

The main takeaways here: Do not make modifications to that roof without the manufacturer’s approval because the roof installer can end up inheriting the liability for that if they do. And, communicate the criteria or the requirements of the warranty to the customer. Don’t just hand them the paperwork. Make sure they understand what’s in it and their responsibilities as metal roof owners. 

3. Ensure proper installer certification and training as required by the warranty type. 

This sounds self-explanatory, but it goes back to the warranty type and the necessity to make sure the warranty selected is appropriate for the job. Verify whether or not the job requires a certified installer and if so, ensure certifications are current. If the installer is not certified, then they need to take the steps to get certified in order to meet that warranty requirement.  

A common situation: A warranty gets sold by a general contractor and he/she subs it out to another roofing contractor. That sub comes in and says not to worry, “we know how to put the roof on. We’re certified.” Then, MBCI gets ready to issue the warranties or schedule inspections and finds out the subcontractor doesn’t know our system that wellAnd remember—for certain types of weathertightness warranties the installer needs to be certified via our training program.

4. The installer is responsible for correct installation per manufacturers details. 

The onus is on the installer to follow the details and directions provided by the manufacturer. If you install the roof per those details, and then there’s a problem, the responsibility falls back on the manufacturer unless determined otherwiseIf, however, the installer doesn’t follow the details provided and the manufacturer comes out to do a warranty claim or warranty inspection, then the installer is going to be responsible for correcting it. The installer can’t put it in wrong and just say, oh, well, that’s covered by the warranty. It’s not. A manufacturer’s warranty is not for covering a bad installationparticularly in the case of a standard warranty. If the installer does a poor install and the roof leaks, that’s not covered by the standard warranty; it falls back on the installer. Of note, this scenario can be different with a single source warranty, since the manufacturer will be out there doing ongoing inspections and ultimately can become responsible for the installation as well. 

And, it goes without saying, the warranty doesn’t cover the interior contents of a building that may be damaged due to an installation issue.  

5. Do not make adds or changes to an installed system once completed and the warranty has been issued without first getting manufacturer approval. 

The warranty only covers the installed product per details, as mentioned. It does not cover additional materials added to the roof or any changes made, at least without the manufacturer’s prior approval—after the install is complete. 

Some examples would be adding a mechanical unit to the roof, a plumbing vent added through the roof, or the satellite TV cable through the roof. Putting a penetration, fasteners, holes of any kind, into a previously installed roof system, unless approved by the manufacturer, will void the warranty in that location. If the manufacturer does not give approval, the installer, along with the customer, would need to make the decision—is it worth the risk to proceed knowing that if the roof leaks, that location would no longer by covered by the warranty.  

To find out more about MBCI warranties and installer certification, contact your local MBCI representative or visit our website.

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